Broker Check

Tax-Saving Tips - January 2019

| February 12, 2019
Share |

Answers to Common Section 199A Questions

For most small businesses and the self-employed, the 20 percent tax deduction from new tax code Section 199A is the most valuable deduction to come out of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

 

The Section 199A tax deduction is complicated, and many questions remain unanswered even after the IRS issued its proposed regulations on the provision. And to further complicate matters, there’s also a lot of misinformation out there about Section 199A.

 

Below are answers to six common questions about this new 199A tax deduction.

 

Question 1. Are real estate agents and brokers in an out-of-favor specified service trade or business for purposes of Section 199A?

 

Answer 1. No.

 

Question 2. Do my S corporation shareholder wages count as wages paid by the S corporation for purposes of the 50 percent Section 199A wage limitation?

 

Answer 2. Yes.

 

Question 3. Will my allowable SEP/SIMPLE/401(k) contribution as a Schedule C taxpayer be based only on Schedule C net earnings, or do I first subtract the Section 199A deduction?

 

Answer 3. You’ll continue to use Schedule C net earnings with no adjustment for Section 199A.

 

Question 4. Is my qualified business income for the Section 199A deduction reduced by either bonus depreciation or Section 179 expensing?

 

Answer 4. Yes, to both.

 

Question 5. I took out a loan to buy S corporation stock. The interest is deductible on my Schedule E. Does the interest reduce my Section 199A qualified business income?

 

Answer 5. Yes, in most circumstances.

 

Question 6. The out-of-favor specified service trade or business does not qualify for the Section 199A deduction, correct?

 

Answer 6. Incorrect.

 

Looking at your taxable income is the first step to see whether you qualify for the Section 199A tax deduction. If your taxable income on IRS Form 1040 is $157,500 or less (single) or $315,000 or less (married, filing jointly) and you have a pass-through business such as a proprietorship, partnership, or S corporation, you qualify for the Section 199A deduction.

 

With taxable income equal to or below the thresholds above, your type of pass-through business makes no difference. Retail store owners and medical doctors with income equal to or below the thresholds qualify in the same exact manner.

Avoiding the Kiddie Tax after Tax Reform

If your family has trouble with the kiddie tax, you face some new wrinkles for tax years 2018 through 2025 thanks to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) tax reform. This is one of the many areas where tax planning can pay off.

 

For 2018–2025, the TCJA tax reform changes the kiddie tax rules to tax a portion of an affected child’s or young adult’s unearned income at the federal income tax rates paid by trusts and estates. Trust tax rates can be as high as 37 percent or, for long-term capital gains and qualified dividends, as high as 20 percent. 

 

Unearned income means income other than wages, salaries, professional fees, and other amounts received as compensation for personal services. So, among other things, unearned income includes capital gains, dividends, and interest. Earned income from a job or self-employment is never subject to the kiddie tax.

 

Your dependent child or young adult faces no kiddie tax problems if he or she does not have unearned income in excess of the kiddie tax unearned income threshold ($2,100 for 2018 and $2,200 for 2019). And when your dependent child exceeds the threshold by only a minor amount, the kiddie tax hit is minimal and nothing to get too upset about.

 

But if your child is getting hit hard by the kiddie tax, your tax planning should consider

 

  • employing your child so that he or she has earned income sufficient to eliminate the kiddie tax, or
  • changing the investment mix from income generation to capital growth.

Share |